Discovering Pie Town, Part Two

We drove from the VLA to Pie Town. “This is it? Really?” There was a cafe on the right, the “Pie-O-Neer”  and a cafe on the left, “The Daily Pie.”Not much else. Dick was completely disoriented and asked how we were supposed to know which cafe to go to. Being far less confused, I reined him in. “Are you kidding? BOTH!”
The Daily Pie had a few customers- cowboys, how fitting! – and a “pie chart” for us to see which pies were available that day. Wish I could tell you what we ordered, but I only recall they were yummy and that we dug into each others slices.
Second stop, the Pie-O-Neer.  There was a shelf of pies in one corner, and a spacious dining area. We decided to sit close to the pie shelf, and ordered our slices after agonizing over the choices. As we savored the pies, we overheard a conversation from the table across the room. “That must be the owner” Dick said, and we listened in on the chat she was having with the other guests. Seems BMI and ASCAP were calling them relentlessly and wanting to charge them for their small, private and very occasional music gatherings after cafe hours. Even out here, in middle of nowhere, with a few friends who want to sing, these music licensing organizations wanted their cut. Since Dick and I have,  in one way or another, been involved in the music business for decades, this intrigued us. We waved her over to our table when she was finished. And there it began.
Kathy makes everyone who comes to the pie shop feel special, as though you could be friends forever, and that’s how it felt for us. We promised her that we would return, but that didn’t happen until six years later, in 2012. Maybe she lied when she said she recognized us but at any rate we were charmed. It felt somewhat like a homecoming, old friends for whom time never passes. We spent hours in the corner booth, watching people come in and go out, watching her greet customers and run in and out of the kitchen tending to pies. “This feels like a movie” I said, and with those words the seed was planted.
The process has not been easy, in fact sometimes excruciating. I simply had an idea for a film, wanting to communicate that for this woman, pie is love and that she has the honor of living and working in a funky, dusty little town steeped in Old West history.
And the best part? No, not that I get to eat as much pie as I want when I’m there. The best part is that Kathy and I have become friends in real life.